Comics worth reading

This list is dedicated to great comics, comic series, and graphic novels that I have enjoyed and been influenced by. Most of these have some social or political commentary, and all of them are highly intelligent. In no particular order, and probably to be updated:

Transmetropolitan

Warren Ellis, Darick Robertson
Approximately 60 issues, ~24 pages each

This is what you get when you mix futuristic cyber-punk with gonzo journalism, in a world of greed and corruption.  It tells the story of Spider Jerusalem - one of the most interesting and lovable social misfits ever created - and his battle to take down the president. This is by far my favourite comic epic.

Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind

Hayao Miyazaki
7 issues, ~240 pages each (originally in japanese, there is an english translation - "the Perfect Collection" that reads left-to-right) Read more »

Welcome Home!

Schweet. I've moved off wordpress.com. Finally.

I've been meaning to do this for years. You may notice that this site is based on drupal. I use drupal for most website designs, and it's far more expandable than wordpress. Which is what I plan to do. I've been meaning to put up a bunch of random things that wouldn't be suited to a blog. Now I can. Read more »

Dealing with [Climate] Denial

Here's a straightforward approach to dealing with denial. Most of these points make sense to me:

Tips for dealing with denial

  • Communicate a consistent message. Do not attempt to “soften the blow” too much, by making the issue seem less than it is.
  • Try not to provide too much information at one time. This sometimes can overwhelm [deniers]. Keep the first meeting as brief and succinct as possible, and end with the scheduling of a follow-up meeting.
  • Ask open-ended questions, and allow [deniers] plenty of time to talk.

IPCC review under way

The IPCC is being reviewed by the Interacademy Council (which represents dozens of national science academies). And they're taking public comment. This might be a good chance to get some improvements. The comments form is at:
http://reviewipcc.interacademycouncil.net/comments.html

If you can't think of anything, here's what I wrote:

  • The IPCC needs to report more frequently. Interim reports, or even annual updates would be very useful.
  • More focus on possible tipping points.

Labor tries to undo 130 years of Conservation.

If you needed any more proof that Frank Sartor is scum, try this:
https://www.npansw.org.au/website/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=657&Itemid=495

Labor are trying to open up National parks for developments. What more can be said?

Sounds good: Worse targets than Kyoto

Of the three announced national carbon targets I've heard of lately, two are arithmetically worse than Kyoto targets, and one is technically worse. The latter is Australia's target, already discussed here.

The others are the recent US announcement, and the recent China announcement.

The US announcement was for a 17% cut, which sounds a bit better than the Kyoto US commitment (or non-commitment, as it turned out) of 7%. But it's not really better, because it's on 2005 levels, where as Kyoto was based on 1990. Read more »

Some mothers do have 'em!

There's a pigeon nesting in the apple tree in my yard. The pigeon has already laid its eggs - two creamy pink ones. The apple tree hasn't dropped it's leaves yet - some are yellow, some are still green. It's the 7th of July - the middle of winter.

Granted, both species are introduced, and the apple is some bastardised cross-breed grafted Frankenstein, each graft of which seems to bud, fruit and drop leaves at different times (which makes it very difficult to know when to prune it). But the image is pretty bizarre. Read more »

Population and climate

This is in response to a discussion about population control and climate change on an e-list I'm on. In particular, it's in response to a line by a mate, Jono:

it's not the number of people that is important, but rather the power of the argument. Population control arguments need to be challenged wherever they occur, because they turn the climate movement into a war against human rights rather than for human rights.


Population control doesn't have to infringe human rights.

Politics

Terry Pratchett notes in one of his discworld books that politics is fundamentally about the running of the city. Politics - from Aristotle's ta politika "affairs of state,", from the Ancient Greek polis - the city state. Read more »

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